Fashion · Needlework · Useful Thing

Sashiko Inspired Mended Jeans

My favorite perfectly worn in jeans got a hole in them. It started small, but every time I washed them, it just got a little bigger and a little bigger again.

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Before: It’s not going to get any smaller….

I knew that I wanted to mend them, but I didn’t want them to look haphazard or shabby. I wanted a result that I could proudly wear just as I would any of my “good” jeans.

Casting around for ideas, I came across the book Mending Matters: Stitch, Patch and Repair Your Favorite Denim & More by Katrina Rodabaugh. In it, she states

When we spend time patching, stitching, darning, or otherwise fixing torn fabrics, we ultimately deepen our understanding of quality, composition, and craftsmanship.

She likes using simple needlework, such as running, straight and whip-stitches in natural fibers to complement the craftsmanship of the original denim garment.

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Pinked edges on my cotton patch will prevent raveling.

At the same time, another book caught my eye, this time about the Japanese quilting technique sashiko. The Ultimate SASHIKO Sourcebook: Patterns, Projects, and Inspirations by Susan Briscoe turned out to be a great general reference and introduction. Many readers will recognize the repeating geometric patterns used in sashiko embroidery, even if unfamiliar with the craft. Since sashiko began centuries ago as a thrifty way to mend all kinds of items made of woven fabric, it seemed like a great fit for mending my old jeans.

I took the patterns as an inspiration and looked at what I had on hand that might work. If I had some denim of a similar weight to my jeans, I could have used that as a patch. Since I didn’t, I looked for a good quality tightly woven fabric that I could attach underneath. Scraps from the quilting cotton I used for my Vintage Style Shirtdress fit the bill and was soft enough that I knew it would not be irritating against the skin.

sashiko_jeans_3I thumbed through the sashiko pattern reference in the Sashiko Sourcebook and chose a simple design that I thought would look nice stitched over about a 3 inch square. I traced the design onto tracing paper using a marker designed for iron-on transfers. (Iron-on transfer pen – black by Sulky.  I have more on tranferring designs in my post on Hand Embroidered Dishtowels.

I considered using fusible tape to temporarily hold the patch in place, but pinned it carefully instead, as Rodabaugh does in her book. On the right side, I chalked a square over the location of the patch. I used the chalk lines to help place my iron-on in place. It turned out to make a nice, solid impression, although a little bit heavier line than I expected.

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Ready to stitch

Sashiko thread is a long staple cotton made especially for the highly visible sashiko stitch. It comes in different weights and colors, and can even be hand dyed. I would love to try it some time, but this time I made do with what I had on hand.

The closest match I could find was a spool of jeans topstitching thread. It’s designed to use with jeans, so the colors coordinated well. To make the stitches stand out a little more, I doubled the thread. I did try to keep the stitches nice and even, but it’s pretty obvious I’m new at this. Even so, I like the way it turned out. I think I put the brakes on the hole’s growth. I think the patch underneath will look interesting if/when it starts to show through.

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The finished mend
Supplies

Aunt Martha’s 8.5 x 12 inch Tracing Paper 50 sheets


Wawak Tex 60 Cotton Wrapped Polyester Jean Topstitching Thread


Sulky Heat Transfer Pen in Black (It also comes in lots of other colors)


The Ultimate SASHIKO Sourcebook: Patterns, Projects, and Inspirations by Susan Briscoe


Mending Matters: Stitch, Patch and Repair Your Favorite Denim & More by Katrina Rodabaugh


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From a distance, the patch is fairly subtle.

Until next time, happy sewing!
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Fashion · Needlework

Embroidered Floral Sweater

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Finished!

I think this little project started because I was still working on the hand basting for my coat and wanted to make something easy that I could enjoy finishing.

Is procrasti-make a word?

I had the floral knit in my stash and a tested pattern ready to go.* Finally all of that pattern prep (and shopping) was going to pay dividends!

At the same time, my January 2019 issue of Threads Magazine arrived. I devoured the article Luscious Sweater Knits by knitwear designer Olgalyn Jolly.**

Under “Flat Hems” on page 37, she writes:

If hemming, don’t sew a knit with poor recovery directly to itself; the hem tends to flare out. Instead, apply a fine stretch mesh or lingerie elastic along the hem allowance to ensure good recovery at the hem.

What a great idea at the perfect time! I quickly added her technique to my plan.

* See Giant Stripes Two Ways

** Threads gives online access to their issues through paid subscriptions, so unfortunately, I can’t provide a link.

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Swedish pattern paper pieces on the sweater knit

The pattern is the Hallå Slim Dolman pattern for women. I chose the tunic length, long sleeve option with hems instead of bands. I had to iron my pattern pieces from last time, but other than that, I just had to take them out of the envelope. In this case, there was no need to even pin the pattern to fabric. The swedish tracing paper clung to the sweater knit, which behaved well while cutting.

Delighted with how well everything was going, I never noticed that I forgot to cut a collar band. By the time I got to it, I didn’t have any material left. We’ll get back to that issue in a minute.

I noticed right away that I would need to keep handling to a minimum, as the edges raveled very easily. Time to put my sweater-knit tricks new and old into practice!

Trick 1: Stabilize shoulder seams

This is a good idea with most knits, but especially where the fabric may not be strong enough to support the weight of the garment. The last time I used (2-way) fusible knit interfacing, I gathered up the scraps and cut them into strips. I fused them in place on all four shoulder edges.

Trick 2: Stretchy stabilized hems

Using the Threads article as a general guide, I put together some really stable and flat hems. I didn’t have lingerie elastic or lightweight mesh on hand, so I cut strips from a piece of power mesh. If you are not familiar with power mesh, you would recognize it as the mesh often used in ready-to-wear bras and shapewear. The only color I had was a hot pink, but since there was pink in the sweater, I figured any show-through would look intentional. I made a little slide show detailing how the hems came together.

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Trick 3: Baste with Wonder Tape

Remember how I forgot to cut a neckband? When I figured out what I did, I looked around for some fabric that would work as a stand-in, but nothing grabbed me. Then I tried it on without the band. The neck opening is very wide, but I kind of liked it. I figured that if I added bra-strap carriers, it would be pretty easy to wear.

I applied wash-away wonder tape to the edge of the neckband for two reasons. First, it served to stabilize the fragile curve and prevent raveling. Second, I could use it as a guide to turn a precise 1/4 in. hem.

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Neatly basted 1/4 in neck opening
Trick 4: Stabilize neckline with strong and decorative embroidered edge

At this point, I could have stitched the neck in place and called it a day. I just thought the top needed a little something extra. Why not use embroidery to highlight it? At the same time, the hand stitching would secure the hem in place.

Using some plain embroidery floss I had on hand, I stitched a simple cross stitch pattern around the entire neck. It’s now a very secure hem, but gives the neck a unique embellishment. My work is not quite as precise as I would like, but that is more than made up for by how happy I am with the color and pattern.

Even with all of the embroidery and extra steps, this was a quick project. I would definitely do another one – just maybe with a neckband next time.

Look familiar? The Super Quick Stash-Buster Scarf was actually made from the scraps left over from cutting this top.

SUPPLIES
Fashion Show

I reviewed the Slim Dolman on patternreview.com. Click here to view.

Happy sewing!

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General · Needlework · Useful Thing

Sewing Gift Guide 2: Stocking Stuffers and Nifty Little Tools

Here are my picks for inexpensive little things every person who sews will enjoy. All of these gifts are under $25, and most of them are small enough to fit in a stocking. Just sayin’.

Key (USD):
  • $ Under 10
  • $$ Between 10-25
Stocking Stuffers
Hand embroidery pocket reference can accompany projects on the go. At Amazon $

Seam ripper with magnifying glass and LED light. How many times have you wanted this when you were trying to see those black stitches in black fabric? From Amazon $

So much better than using tape to mark seam widths on your sewing machine(s). Comes with a little booklet. From Amazon $

Set of 100 little clips in a tin container. Every home sewing area needs these. They make it so easy to attach binding, work with small fiddly seams and more. From Amazon $




There are a lot of cute pincushions out there, but this is my current favorite. Pincushion hedgehog from AsNiceAsMice on Etsy. $$
Keep your fingers safe from burns when you iron with silicone finger guards. These are great because they your fingernails free. Perfect for people with long nails! Amazon $.
This flexible strip of LED lights can be stuck onto any machine that needs more light. From Amazon $$.
I have both the 5/8 and the 3/8 version of this ruler and I use them on almost every clothing sewing project. They make adjusting patterns so easy! This is the 5/8 inch pattern drafter ruler from SA Curve on Amazon. $$


Missed my first gift guide? Find it here: Sewing Gift Guide 1: Handmade and Made to Make.

I’ll be back soon with an update on the winter coat project. Until then, happy shopping!

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General · Needlework · Useful Thing · Whimsy

Sewing Gift Guide 1: Handmade and Made to Make

This is the time of year that people start casting around for what to give for the holidays. If you are shopping for the person in your life who sews, or just for yourself, keep reading.

Key (USD):
  • $ Under 10
  • $$ Between 10-25
  • $$$ Between 25-50
  • $$$$ Over 50

When you make things for other people, you really appreciate how much effort and thought goes into handmade gifts. Maybe you don’t have the time or inclination to make a handmade gift this year. But you can purchase items that someone else has crafted, and support small businesses at the same time. With that in mind, I’ve pulled together some of my favorite handmade gift ideas from people who sell on Etsy.com.

Made to Make

Here are several ideas for complete pre-packaged projects. It’s always fun to have a new toy to play with after all the gifts are opened, isn’t it?

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Complete empbroidery kit from HoffeltandHooperCo. Multiple colors, sizes and designs. $$$+
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Learn how to needle felt by making a tiny cactus. Kits from BenzieDesign. $$
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Felted pompom garland kit – pick colors, how many and what size felt ball. From BenzieDesign. $-$$$

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Complete beginner starter kit for sashiko embroidery from MikkeJapan $$
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Scrappy rope rug kit from SewHungryHippie. $$
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Peace dove hand stitching kit from CynthiaTreenStudio $$$

Little Luxuries

Now I know that you would never take the pleasure of buying fabric away from your favorite person who sews. But there are lots of other sewing goodies that they would love to own but wouldn’t buy for themselves. Here are a few of my favorites.

Pattern weights

Pattern weights can be just about anything (I have been known to use soup cans). But it’s much more fun to have a set that makes you smile. Here are some great handmade options.

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3D printed pattern weight set from thegigglingriz. $$

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Realistic donuts! from SewCuteNQuirky $$$

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Marble pattern weights from SewStitchinSouthern. $$$ Customizing available.

Design Tools

Design and sewing go hand in hand. How about a few items that help to collect and plan those creative ideas?

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Sewing Theme Vision Board from LuckyJo11 $$$ Customizable

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Hardcover fashion designer’s notebook includes 140 women’s figure templates and more from EnchantedFabric. $$

Pressing Tools

I found some tools for the ironing station that many people who sew do without – but they shouldn’t! Here are some beautiful additions to anyone’s work space.

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Ham holder and clapper from JacksonsWoordworksLLC. $$$

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Custom tailor’s ham and sleeve roll set from StitchNerd. $$$$

Thread

Opening a package with a rainbow of color never fails to please. How about giving some high-end thread? It’s a little luxury your sewing friend will enjoy whether undertaking elaborate embellishment, basting or just mending a tear.

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Sashiko Thread Set – 15 skeins from SnugglyMonkey $$$
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Japanese cotton basting thread (multiple colors available) from AliceInStitchesArts $

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Embroidery Floss: Sublime Stitching Mingles Set from SnugglyMonkey $
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Valdani Wool Thread Collection from AliceinStitchesArts $$$

Finishing Touch

I like it when people put labels in their handmade items. Show them that you value their unique craftsmanship by giving them custom labels. Here are a few options to get started.

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Spool of 1/2 inch printed twill tape from InkedPapers $$

 

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Custom printed satin labels from NinaTags $$

I’m pulling together another guide, which will focus on gadgets and stocking stuffers. Oh – and I’m still working on the winter coat. Updates soon!

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