Home Dec

Quick Fun Project: Tissue Box Covers

il_570xN.1272695841_fsug
Handmade tissue box covers aren’t always the decor you want. This one is kind of growing on me though.

I’m the first to admit that hand-made tissue box covers can go horribly, horribly, wrong. But stick with me – they don’t have to. In fact, they can add a little charm to just about any room.

If you are looking for an easy to make gift, or simply to brighten up one of your own spaces, you might want to give these covers a try.

I found a free tutorial for some quick tissue box covers on Blueprint. There are lots of them out there, but this one worked well for me.

Using the tutorial as a guide, I made a pattern for the cube shaped style of tissue box. You could make your cover as simple as a single layer of opaque fabric. Or you could make something padded, lined, and trimmed. It’s really up to you.

I opted for a more finished cover with bias trim and a lined inside. So for each cover, I used the pattern to cut 5 layers:

  • Outer fabric
  • Lining fabric
  • 2 Interfacing (I used a medium weight fusible)
  • Batting (I used a fusible version)

Fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the fabric pieces. Trim the batting piece to remove the seam allowance (or just cut smaller to begin with). Then fuse it to the interfacing side of the outer fabric.

Through all layers, stitch an outline of  the top edge of the box shape. Then clip the corners to the stitching line.

Cut a hole in the center slightly smaller than the desired opening. Cut into the hole’s corners to make tabs that can be folded to the inside. Clip or pin the tabs to the inside then carefully topstitch them in place.

To trim the opening, you can simply place binding tape or trim on the inside of the box and sew in place. Or you can be fancy and apply the binding around the hole’s edge.

To get a perfect fit, pin the side seams while arranging the cover lining-side out over a tissue box. Then make a strong overcast seam on all four sides.

To finish, apply contrasting trim around the bottom edge.

TIP: Keep a covered empty tissue box at your sewing station. It’s a great place to tuck thread clippings and other small trash as you work.

SUPPLIES
  • tissue_box_cover_16Fabric: inner, outer: any woven fabric will do. I like quilting cottons just for the variety of designs available. Requirements will vary depending on the size of the tissue box. You will need a piece slightly larger than 2 x height of box side + (box length) X 2 x height of box side + (box width). Great for those scraps you can’t get rid of!
  • Bias Tape: buy the pre-packaged kind or make your own. In this case, you don’t have to cut bias strips. You can cut your strips on the grain because it won’t need to stretch around curves. So, you can use those little scraps for this too!
  • Fusible interfacing: The stiffer the interfacing, the crisper looking your cover will be. I used Pellon SF101, but you can go softer or harder if you prefer.
  • Batting: I happened to have some fusible fleece on hand, but any batting will do.

More coming soon!

sewing_sig

Fashion

Super Quick Stash-Buster Scarf

floral_scarf_1
Sweater knit up close.

I had just finished cutting out a cute new top (coming soon) out of a lightweight floral sweater knit. When I was done, I still had a wide length of fabric. It wasn’t enough to use for any garments though.

Regular readers will know that I like to find ways of using every little bit of leftover fabric. Because my scrap was basically a wide rectangle, it was perfect for a scarf.

I smoothed out the piece on my large cutting mat, aligning the grain as best as I could. Like many stretch fabrics, it was somewhat pulled out of shape near the selvedge. I cut that part away. Then I used the gridlines on my cutting mat and a long ruler to cut the largest rectangle I could, resulting in a 50 x 15 inch piece.

floral_scarf_2
The scarf fully extended

The cutting doesn’t have to be perfect. This project is very forgiving of mistakes.

While still at the cutting table, I folded the rectangle lengthwise, right sides together. This sweater knit stuck to itself very well, so I didn’t bother pinning it. Then I serged the long raw edges together using a 4 thread overlock.

I turned the tube so the right side was facing out, then serged the openings to each other. I had to hand stitch the last little opening, then done!

Instant gratification projects are so fun, don’t you think? Now excuse me while I rummage through all of my sweater scraps.

SUPPLIES

I had fun trying out some styling ideas….

Lots more coming soon!

Until then, happy sewing!

sewing_sig

Fashion · Knitting

Red Garter Stitch Scarf

redgarterscarf_2redgarterscarf_3I made another scarf! This one was a special request. The assignment: use a specific yarn to make a simple, long, lightweight scarf. No embellishments or fancy stitching desired.

I think the finished object fit the brief. With one skein of Cascade Heritage Quatro (400 meters), I went back and forth in garter stitch, slipping one stitch at the beginning of each row. The quatro is a sock weight yarn, so the entire project was done on tiny size 2 needles. It’s a very nice merino/nylon blend yarn made from plies of four different colors twisted together. When knitted together, they make a nice blended effect. Unfotunately, I think I may have bought the last one in existence, because I can’t find any more anywhere. I think you could approximate the effect by holding four different strands of a laceweight yarn together though.

That’s the last bit of knitting for a little while.

More sewing coming soon!

sewing_sig

redgarterscarf_1
Scarf as work in progress. You can clearly see the twisted strands in the sock yarn.
Home Dec · Useful Thing

Quickie Serger Coasters

While Mom and I were were picking through her fabric stash last November (see where I get it?), She came across some upholstery scraps.

Me: “That piece is pretty small. Do you still want it?”

Mom: “I always wanted to make coasters out of this.  I was going to just serge around the edges. But I don’t have my serger anymore.”

Me: “Do you still want coasters out of it?”

Mom: “Yes, but I don’t have my serger anymore.”

I took that as a hint that Mom wanted coasters for Christmas, although I suppose I could have also taken it as a hint that Mom wanted a serger. I took the piece home with me, fairly confident that she would forget all about it. Then I got to work.

coasters1
Start with a couple of tiny scraps.

It really was a small piece. I was able to squeeze just  8 5-inch squares out of it.

coasters2.jpg
Cutting 5-inch squares is easy with a 5-inch quilting ruler
coasters3
Ready to begin

I had read about using wooly nylon to make decorative edges. The little coasters seemed like a good way to test out the idea. I looked through my collection of stretch serger thread. I have a few different kinds. Some are Wooly Nylon, some are textured nylon, some are textured poly. The tan color that matched the best was textured nylon.

I learned a lot more than I expected to with this little project.

I’ve become fairly proficient at setting up my serger. I’ve figured out that the best way to thread the fluffy nylon is to use a needle threader. It’s faster to bend the little wire on the threader to go through the serger’s tiny holes than trying to pull it through with another thread.

I set up the machine with a two-thread wrapped edge overlock stitch, with the needle in the wide position. The nylon is in the lower looper and coordinating regular serger thread is in the left needle. Luckily, my machine has a preset tension setting for this purpose, so I didn’t have to mess around with that.

coasters4
How do I cover those corners?
coasters7
Ugh. Another view of my first attempt.

The first attempt was pretty discouraging. The edges didn’t get covered completely and the corners were not covered at all.

Part of the problem was that the textured nylon is not as fluffy as the woolly nylon. But I thought I could still make the edges fill in by making the stitch length as short as possible and being careful. But those corners? Hmm….

When I thought about it, following my manual’s instructions for turning around a square corner probably worked exactly as they intended. They probably assume that the stitch is to be used on the inside of a garment, so it doesn’t matter if the coverage is less.

For my next attempt, I changed my strategy.

  1. Stitch the edge to the end
  2. Keep going past the edge for about .25 inches, making a short “tail.”
  3. Lift the presser foot and reposition the square, wrapping the extra bit of stitching around the corner.
  4. Place the needle in the down position close to the to edge. Lower the presser foot.
  5. Stitch the next side, stitching over the tail

This method worked pretty well for me, although the first few coasters made with it look pretty rough. It took some practice to get the hang of it.

coasters5
Edge filled in nicely after second pass and shorter stitch length
coasters8
Some corners are better than others, but they all got some fray check to prevent unraveling

Finally, I wrapped them all up and placed them under the Christmas tree.

Oh, and Mom? She did not guess what was in her gift. And she thinks the coasters look nice. Thanks, Mom.

coasters9

 

Useful Thing

Vanity Table Headbands

This is a chance to use up all of those partially used cards of trim.

I like to put on a headband while I get ready for my day.  It keeps the hair off of my face while I stand at the sink or sit in front of the mirror. Unfortunately, pre-made headbands are always too loose for me. Instead of settling, I make my own.

I like to make flat headbands with hook and loop closures. I can make them loose or tight depending on where I connect the ends. They are really easy to make and a fun way to use up scraps.

Here’s how:

You’ll need

  • Terry or towel fabric
  • 1 1/2 – 2 yards wide or extra-wide double-fold bias binding such as Wrights or make your own
  • 3/4 in. to 1 1/4 in. sew-on hook and loop tape, such as Velcro
  • Matching thread
  • Any trims that appeal to you – just make sure they can be washed
Cutting is so simple, it is easy to do more than one at a time

Seems obvious, but measure your head first. Write down the measurement and add at least 3 inches. That will be the length of the band.

If you haven’t already, wash and dry the terry cloth.

Lay the terry flat and cut a strip 2 1/2 inches x your chosen length.

Cut a 3 inch strip of hook and loop tape.

I made a semi-circular template with a 2 1/2 inch diameter out of lightweight cardboard, then used it and a fabric marker to mark the headband’s rounded ends. If you want to leave them square or cut free-hand, that’s fine too. Use sharp fabric scissors to cut the ends.

Sew the fuzzy piece of tape (loop) to one end of the top side, 1/2 inch from one end. Sew the rough (hook) piece to the opposite end on the bottom side, one inch from the end.

Sew trim (rickrack, appliques, etc.) to the top side, if desired.

Using your favorite method, sew binding around raw edges. I like to clip the binding in place, but also use steam to help shape it to fit around the curved ends. TIP: You’ll get better results if you iron the kinks out of the binding before working with it.

Close up of hook and loop tape

Done!

Variations:

  • Scale down for kids.
  • Instead of binding, serge the edges with colorful thread.
  • Make a quilted version by sandwiching cotton batting between a top and bottom strip.
  • Make matching headbands with scraps from pajama or bathrobe projects.

This is definitely one of my favorite stash-busting projects.

Have you tried making headbands? Tell me about it!

Ready for a spa day!