Contest · Fashion · Vintage

Fall Wardrobe: Green Sailor Pants

green_sailor_pants21I’m getting started on my Fall wardrobe with a pair of olive green sailor-style wide leg pants. These are View E of the Butterick wardrobe pattern B5859. Essentially, they are high waisted pants with a back zip. If they look a little familiar, it’s because I have made them before. Why re-invent the wheel?

Previous Versions:

I dreamed up these pants as part of my Fall wardrobe plan, but also as part of a 5-piece wardrobe to enter in patternreview.com‘s 2018 Mini Wardrobe Contest. Even though this is make number 3, I used several new techniques and learned a lot.

Selvedge Trimmed Facing

green_sailor_pants15After I finished cutting out the pants, I cut the selvedges off the remaining fabric and set them aside. Pre-washing the fabric had brought out their texture as well as a short fluffy fringe. After recently buying some trim by the yard, saving this “trim” seemed like a good way to economize.

Meanwhile, I went through my scrap pile and picked out a piece of pretty floral lawn that coordinated with the green. I think that one of the delights of sewing for yourself is using surprising fabrics for pocket linings, facings, and bindings that only you can see. The floral became the waistband facing fabric.

Serendipitously, I had piled the twill strips piled on top of the facing pieces. They looked so good together that I used the strips to make a sharp binding for the facing’s bottom edge. Here’s a little slideshow of the facing going together.

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Basting with Double Eye Needle
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Very long basting stitches along zipper opening

Do any of you read your sewing machine manuals just for fun? It sounds dull, but if you haven’t cracked yours since your machine was new, it’s worth going back and taking a second look. When my machine was new, I was only interested in learning the basics: threading, straight stitch, zigzag, etc. Now that those skills are second nature, the rest of the manual is much more approachable. All of this is by way of introducing the double eye needle.

My manual has a page devoted to using a double eye needle (not to be confused with a double needle) to make long basting stitches. I don’t know if this trick works universally, or only with some machines, but it is pretty slick. Here’s what you do:

  1. Thread machine normally, threading the needle through the upper of the two eyes.
  2. Set stitch to blind hem stitch
  3. Set stitch width to widest setting
  4. Set stitch length as desired
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Thread in upper eye of double eye needle

These settings will result in a long straight stitch slightly to the left of center (test the needle position before sewing to learn how this works). Since the blind hem makes its stitches in a 3 to 1 pattern (RIGHT RIGHT RIGHT LEFT), you will get a stitch that is 4 times as long as the selected stitch length.

Once you are done, you can continue to sew normally by just switching to the bottom eye.

Double eye needles are a little tricky to find. I have never seen them in shops and they are even hard to find online. I located a package of 5 size 80 universal double eye needles in just 3 places:

  1. Create for less $4.59
  2. Amazon $6.50
  3. Directly from Schmetz $4.99

If anyone else has other or better sources, please post a comment!

Finishing Touches

green_sailor_pants16I really like the look of vintage sailor-style button front pants. I can’t imagine how annoying they must be to actually open and close when you need to (ahem). For my pants, I just copied the look without copying the design. Besides, I was already going off on my own with the green color. The buttons are just sewn on – there are no actual buttonholes. I sewed the buttons on top of the seams created by the front darts.

I wound up using an invisible zipper, just because that is what I had on hand. I don’t think it makes a big difference in this case, but I think a plain zipper would go better with the casual style.

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Supplies

Here’s what I used:

What do you think about the supplies list? Should I keep doing them?

Next time, more Fall fashion.

Until then, happy sewing!

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I reviewed this pattern on patternreview.com. Check it out here!

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Fashion · Fitting

Getting Started on my Designer Pattern

designer_18Last week I wrote about choosing a designer pattern from Vogue. I was between a beautiful on-trend jumpsuit and a cute pull-on dress with a tie front. The winner is…  the easy one!

Although I love the jumpsuit, I just couldn’t justify making it when I don’t have any events to bring it to.

Also, I find myself drawn to Rebecca Taylor’s style aesthetic. Her collections provide me with a lot of inspiration, featuring prominently in my Fall 2018 mood board on pinterest.

I was reluctant to cut into the silk I chose for the final version (Thanks, Mom!). So, I looked for some lightweight cottons to make a (hopefully) wearable muslin. I have plenty of sundress-worthy cottons in my stash, but it was tricky to find something that would look good from either side. In the end, I went with a sort of washed denim colored solid for the dress and a fun multicolor stripe for the lining.

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Both fabrics frayed like crazy, so I overcast the edges before sewing anything together.

I wanted to make sure that the ties fell at my natural waist, so I spent a more time preparing the pattern than usual. I added my normal long waist adjustment all the way around. The back overlay piece was a little perplexing. When I added the extra length, it completely changed the shape of the ties. I improvised a new curve to smooth it out, keeping the start and end points where they were and crossed my fingers.

I cut the pieces according to the directions with one exception. I thought it would be kind of neat to have the inside back piece be the same as the skirt lining.

Once I got to the sewing machine, I was delighted with how quickly it went together. The neckline and armholes are faced, but use bias binding for the facing instead of the more common facing pieces. I have been experimenting with this technique for a while, and actually prefer it in most cases. However, until you are used to it, it can be maddeningly confusing. If you are doing this dress and have never tried the technique, find an online tutorial and practice a bit first. It may save you a lot of seam ripping! The “very narrow hem” that I was wondering about turned out to be really easy. I like the way it turned out and will use it again on projects with lightweight fabrics. I think that some fabrics might do better with a rolled hem, though. I’ll have to test that out for the final version.

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Very narrow hem (top) and bias-faced armholes

One weird thing about the pattern is that instead of using a conventional casing for the waist elastic, you make a completely inner casing using the seam allowances. Essentially you get a casing “tube” that is only attached to the dress on one side, not both.  It works out, but probably would fail with any elastic wider than 1/4 inch. It doesn’t seem to matter that the casing is kind of free-floating.

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Inside front view shows seam allowance casing

Another technique that was new to me was reinforced stress points. You are supposed to cut small pieces of fabric and sew them to the wrong side of the overlay at each point. I departed from the instructions and chose to fuse my  little patches in place rather than sew them. I think they are probably stronger and they don’t show on the front. I used heat-n-bond lite 5/8″ tape for a quick and easy patch.

I haven’t done a lined skirt in a while, but it was the last step and there wasn’t anything unusual about it. That kind of complacency is probably what led to me putting it in inside-out. Sigh. There’s a lesson in there somewhere. I’m leaving it that way. Shhh…

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Perfect! If you don’t look too close….

The finished dress fits! The ties wound up in the right place and look good. I do think it will look much better in a silkier fabric. The overlay sleeves made with semi-crisp cotton don’t drape elegantly down the shoulders like the ones on the pattern photo. I also think it would be much better with side pockets. But those are minor quibbles. It meets my test for wearability and I have a usable pattern so I’ll call it a success.

The next one in this series will be my first ever silk dress. Wish me luck!

Until then, happy sewing!

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More nuts and bolts…

And a few more pictures from my fashion shoot/dog walk…

Hey – check out my review of Vogue 1395 on patternreview.com here.

Fashion

Attempting a Vogue Designer Pattern

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard

You know when the patterns go on sale and you think “it’s such a bargain – I should get one or two more” (or 3, or 4… you get the idea). For years, I have purchased designer patterns from Vogue only to watch them take up space on my shelf. Granted, I do pull them out and daydream. Patterns from other companies rarely call for high-end fabrics, but these do. For instance, on one pattern the only fabric option for lining is china silk.

I think it’s time to dive in. I have narrowed my selection to two patterns, both very different.

Option 1

Rebecca Taylor V1395 Dress

Rating: Easy

V1395_05From the envelope picture, and even the line drawings, this dress looks pretty simple. It appears to be a pullover dress with a gathered skirt and front tie. The devil is in the details, though. It wasn’t until I took the instructions out and really examined what was involved before I realized the dress’s complexity.

First, the fabric. It recommends (1) Crepe de Chine, (2) Silk Broadcloth, (3) Chambray, or (4) Rayon Blends. I get 1, 2 and 4 – they are all thin, semi-fluid types of fabric. I’m a little stumped about the Chambray option. Isn’t that going to be heavier?

Here are the unexpected bits:

  • The skirt is lined. I probably skimmed over this because there is no fabric recommendation for lining.
  • The arm and neck openings are bias-faced, which means making some bias binding. Not super difficult, but might be fiddly with slippery fabrics.
  • The back has 2 layers. The inner layer is kind of a sleeveless shell. The outer layer attaches at the shoulder and waist, but extends the sleeves into a cap sleeve and the sides into long ties, which go to the front.
  • “Very narrow hems.” I’m not exactly sure what this means, but I think it’s going to involve a new technique.
  • No interfacing. There is nothing added to give any additional stability.
Option 2

Rebecca Vallance V1591 Jumpsuit

Rating: Average

V1591_01Again, the cover photo and drawings don’t really do justice to the design. I impulse-bought this one because I loved the shape of the top and I had never had a jumpsuit before. But you don’t really see that the whole outfit is two-layer: lace fabric over an underlining. I didn’t realize it was lace from the printed picture, but if you zoom way in on the one on the Vogue website, you can see that it is black lace over a dark blue underlining. It uses a grosgrain ribbon for the straps – they are not fabric. You can just barely see it in the picture, but it has an exposed back zipper as well.

Clearly the jumpsuit is more complicated. Among other things, it features:

  • Side pockets
  • Close fitting top
  • Silk (under)lining
  • Pleats
  • Interesting curved shapes at center front waist

This one does call for interfacing. Curiously, it also calls for crepe or poplin “contrast” fabric. I had to break open the envelope to find that this is just for the facings.

The recommended fabrics are lace, linen, and silk jacquard. I think it would look cool in any of those. Can you see making a big splash at a holiday party in a jacquard version?

They are both calling me, but I promised myself I would only do one at a time. It’s possible after that’s over I may decide to never do another!

Next time, my decision and getting started. Anyone up for a sew-along?

Happy sewing,

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