Fashion

Lazy Winter 2: Cowl-neck Pullover

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My first version of V9055

I wanted to do another easy project for the top to my lazy winter outfit. I really enjoyed making the Burgundy Cowl-Neck Tunic (Vogue V9055 View C), and I wear it all the time. What could be easier than making a pattern I have already tried and know to work?

Yet again, I have fabric that I bought without a plan. This time the fabric was from a mystery box of knits from Sincerely Rylee. It was full of all kinds of goodies, but as soon as I took the thin, drapey hacci knit out of the box I knew it was meant to be my second cowl-neck.

It was obvious after test-sewing a swatch that the new fabric would be tricky to sew. The knit had a much lighter, more open weave than the one I used before. I couldn’t seem to get either the serger or the regular sewing machine to to grab on to make a stitch.

At first the two fabrics seem very similar.

 

Looking closely, you can see that the second fabric has thinner yarn and larger stitches.

What ended up working was pinning strips of water-soluble stabilizer under all of the seams before sewing. I lightened the presser-foot pressure a little bit and that did the trick. The knit was so floppy that I took extra precautions around the neckline as well. Instead of just stay-stitching, I stitched stay-tape around the entire opening.

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Note to self: look for a good fusible or sticky back dissolvable alternative. That pinning took a while!

I noticed that the zig-zag stitch I used to sew my label on was just about invisible from the outside. So I made it easy on myself and did the hems with a simple zig-zag on my regular machine.

Adding all of that stabilizer meant that I had to re-wash everything before I could wear it. But it worked. All of the stabilizer just disappeared!

The finished top is just as comfortable and flattering as the first one I made. I think that this one might get a little more use because the lighter weight will be comfortable in Spring and Fall as well.

Here’s my final lazy-day look. Now, excuse me while I take a snooze.

 

Fashion

Burgundy Cowl-Neck Tunic

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Cover art for V9055 View C

This is one of those projects where the fabric dictated what it wanted to be. As soon as I saw the gorgeous heathered burgundy hacci fabric, I knew it was meant to be a loose cowl-neck pull-over. And it would be mine. I guess if pressed, I would deny that the fabric literally spoke to me, but fellow sewists will recognize that subtle whisper.

I love cowl neck garments in the cooler months. Now that there are so many lovely lightweight knits on the market, sweaters can use bulkier design elements like cowls, gathers, and draping. With that in mind, I landed on Vogue 9055. One of the views was exactly what I had in mind. View C is a cowl-neck raglan tunic with a high-low hem and a kangaroo pocket (which I omitted). Although I had recently done a raglan tee and copied out a good version of the pattern, I chose to start fresh with this one since I was looking for a garment with more ease.

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The sleeve pieces fit together so the outside wraps around the inside. In other words, you have a seam on each side of your wrist, not one down the middle.

Vogue 9055 is a “Very Easy” pattern, and this time I agree. I spent more time preparing the pattern and cutting out the pieces than I did assembling everything. I even made it a bit more complicated by finishing all of the raw edges and it still was only about two hours of actual sewing.

This pattern was unusual in that it featured a two-part sleeve. I was a little concerned that the sleeve seams would be prominent and distracting in the finished garment, but my fears were unfounded. I’m intrigued and hope to learn more about them and how they can best be used.

I was surprised that the neckline was so deep. It’s clearly shown on the illustrations, but somehow I didn’t notice. I think if I were to make this with the regular scoop neckline, I would make the neckline a little higher. I would also try omitting the darts, especially if I was going for a sportier look.

Once again, I used serger thread only for the serger’s loopers and used “regular” thread for the serger needle. It would have been nice to match all of the thread, but when the garment is on, the black looper threads don’t show at all.

Next time, a short detour into activewear again. What are you making for fall?