Fashion

Winter Coat Part 2: So Many Pieces!

V9040
I’m making View A

I started my winter coat project last week and can’t wait to share what I have learned. As I shared in Part I, I am making Vogue Patterns’ V9040 using the Craftsy/Blueprint course Inside Vogue Patterns’ Coatmaking Techniques V9040 with Steffani Lincecum.

Before I started cutting into the good fabric, I tested the unaltered pattern by making a muslin. The coat has two sets of pieces: one larger set for the coat exterior, and one slightly smaller for the lining. For the muslin, I just used the lining pieces, omitting the collar and making only one sleeve.

Trying it on, I found that I would need to lengthen it about an inch to make the waist fall where it should. Otherwise, everything seemed to work.

I’m used to altering pattern pieces, but I think this is the first time I have had to lengthen 6 pieces for a single waist adjustment!

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54 pieces? Seriously?

Pattern pieces in hand, I was ready to start cutting. Since I had 5 different materials to cut, I made a checklist. Between the wool, the lining, the underlining, the interfacing and the collar, I had to cut 54 pieces. Yep – 54.

For the exterior, I cut out the main fabric and an interfacing or an underlining piece for each coat part. Following along with the class, I resolved to get all of those prepared before moving on to the lining.

I used the instructor’s recommendation and applied fusible knit interfacing to the wrong side of the coat’s front, front facing, sleeve facing, and under-collar. Then I re-pinned the pattern piece to transfer markings and cut notches. I used tracing paper and a tracing wheel for the markings.

TIP: use a dedicated press cloth for fusibles. Mark the top “this side up” so that any stray adhesive comes off on one side of the press cloth instead of the iron.

I backed the remaining coat pieces with a flat-lining (black cotton lawn). First, I pinned the cotton lawn to the wrong side of the wool, gently pulling the edge inward to accommodate the “turn of the cloth,” or the extra space the thick exterior fabric takes from the seam allowance. I used my japanese basting thread to hand baste the lawn in place. As with the fused pieces, I re-pinned the pattern piece back in place. I cut notches and transferred markings, this time using tailor’s tacks.

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It’s going to be a little while before I’m ready to start putting the pieces together, but I promise you will be the first to know!

Until then, happy sewing!

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Fashion

Winter Coat Part 1: The Plan

V9040
I’ll be making View A

I’m making my own winter coat. Here’s why:

Cost – I checked out several retailers looking at basic, lined, medium length wool or wool blend coats. The coats I found all had front pockets and polyester lining. Prices ranged from $150-$400 for mid-range brands. I made a mental note that I did not want the materials for my coat to exceed $150.

Fit – Although fit is less crucial in a roomy garment like a coat, it still matters. Obviously, sewing your own leaves fit in your own hands.

Quality – I don’t think I have ever had any problems with the construction of store-bought coats. Materials are another story. I’m hoping that I can avoid torn linings, pilling and other wear and tear by using better quality fabrics.

Style and Details – I like pockets. I love when I am able to go for a walk without having to carry a bag because my pockets do the job alone. While most coats typically have some kind of front pockets, that’s where it stops. I think I can do better. I also don’t want to have the same thing as everyone else.

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Silk twill lining fabric

I mentioned in a previous post that I purchased a coat-making course from Craftsy*. The interactive, online video lessons also come with a pattern, Vogue V9040, which the instructor, Steffani Lincecum, uses as her example throughout. Before buying anything else, I went through the course. I confirmed that I still wanted to do it, and noted all the ways the course instructions deviate from the pattern. For example, the pattern calls for sew-in interfacing while the course uses fusible knit interfacing.

*Craftsy and Bluprint both offer this course. If you are a Bluprint customer, you will need to purchase the pattern separately.

With pattern and notes in hand, I started hunting for materials. It took over a month. I am glad that I started looking when I did, because it took a while to wait for swatches and make final decisions.

Supplies

I think I’m ready to begin. Here’s the result of my shopping spree (includes shipping):

TOTAL $210

I’m already over budget by $60. Oops. I chose to use silk for the lining, and that was really expensive. My rationale was that silk is warm and hard wearing. It’s also something that will bring me joy whenever I put on my coat. New budget rationalized!

Next time – Preparing the pieces

Until then, stay warm and happy sewing!

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Fashion

Last Chance Sundress V9278

V9278_aHere in the US, the kids are going back to school and cooler weather is around the corner. Oddly, we are breaking heat records here in Rhode Island and anyone with air conditioning is staying inside. Fortunately for me, that’s where the sewing machine is!

I love wearing sundresses, but somehow never got around to making one this year. It’s time.

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the elusive inspiration dress

I chose Vogue 9278 because I wanted the a Burda Style magazine pattern that was used to make a beautiful dress in the Spring Forecast section of the April/May 2018 issue of Threads Magazine. Despite an hour of effort, I could not find the Burda pattern anywhere. Vogue 9278 was one of Threads’ recommended substitutes.

The inspiration dress was described as having been made with a pastel voile. So I looked through my stash for a voile that would work. I found enough yardage of a blue and yellow geometric pattern* in cotton voile. I also had some lightweight woven in bright yellow for the lining. Stash busting!

*the fabric was a bargain find from Fabric Mart a few years ago. It’s an Anna Maria Horner quilting fabric called Diamond Mine. It turns out that Fabric Mart stopped carrying it, but you can still get the matching ribbon. I’m kind of tempted to buy some and make a matching leash for my dog. That’s not going overboard, is it? Fabric Mart does carry lots of other Anna Maria fabrics, including a few voiles – I love their bright color combinations.

You may have noticed that my dress looks absolutely nothing like the Burda dress. Apparently not all voiles are created equal. Mine has a lot more body and is almost opaque. Even so, it makes a pretty cute little slip dress. I’ll probably wear this all of the time. I don’t think I would have worn the pretty floaty one as much, although I would still love to have it. (I made View A.)

The dress was pretty simple to put together. I think Vogue was being fair this time in putting it in the very easy category. As usual, I made things more difficult than they had to be. I became a little obsessed with pattern matching. I needed those diamonds to line up! I also used an invisible zip, just because that was what I had on hand. The pattern doesn’t actually demand it.

Above: Implementing my Obsession

I think if/when I make this one again, I will build in a bra and maybe try a handkerchief hem. If I go with a heavier fabric again, I’ll also add pockets. With the lining taken out, I think it would also make cool under-dress for a mesh or chiffon cover.

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Note about pictures:

Most of the time, I use helpers to take pictures of me wearing my finished garments. This round was completely DIY. I got a new toy: a little bluetooth remote control that lets me take pictures from my phone without having to hold it ($8.49 from Amazon). I still prefer help, but I’m excited to try taking pictures a little more often. You will probably notice that I am holding it along with the dog leash in the next photo group. Sadly, the remote won’t tell you if you have hair in your face or a wrinkle in your dress. Ahem. I’m still learning, so most of the pictures are a little low-resolution. Stay with me – I plan on improving!

My dog is much more interested in fresh mulch than fashion.

More sewing coming soon!

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Check out my review on patternreview.com: Vogue 9278

 

 

Fashion

Lazy Winter 2: Cowl-neck Pullover

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My first version of V9055

I wanted to do another easy project for the top to my lazy winter outfit. I really enjoyed making the Burgundy Cowl-Neck Tunic (Vogue V9055 View C), and I wear it all the time. What could be easier than making a pattern I have already tried and know to work?

Yet again, I have fabric that I bought without a plan. This time the fabric was from a mystery box of knits from Sincerely Rylee. It was full of all kinds of goodies, but as soon as I took the thin, drapey hacci knit out of the box I knew it was meant to be my second cowl-neck.

It was obvious after test-sewing a swatch that the new fabric would be tricky to sew. The knit had a much lighter, more open weave than the one I used before. I couldn’t seem to get either the serger or the regular sewing machine to to grab on to make a stitch.

At first the two fabrics seem very similar.

 

Looking closely, you can see that the second fabric has thinner yarn and larger stitches.

What ended up working was pinning strips of water-soluble stabilizer under all of the seams before sewing. I lightened the presser-foot pressure a little bit and that did the trick. The knit was so floppy that I took extra precautions around the neckline as well. Instead of just stay-stitching, I stitched stay-tape around the entire opening.

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Note to self: look for a good fusible or sticky back dissolvable alternative. That pinning took a while!

I noticed that the zig-zag stitch I used to sew my label on was just about invisible from the outside. So I made it easy on myself and did the hems with a simple zig-zag on my regular machine.

Adding all of that stabilizer meant that I had to re-wash everything before I could wear it. But it worked. All of the stabilizer just disappeared!

The finished top is just as comfortable and flattering as the first one I made. I think that this one might get a little more use because the lighter weight will be comfortable in Spring and Fall as well.

Here’s my final lazy-day look. Now, excuse me while I take a snooze.

 

Fashion

Burgundy Cowl-Neck Tunic

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Cover art for V9055 View C

This is one of those projects where the fabric dictated what it wanted to be. As soon as I saw the gorgeous heathered burgundy hacci fabric, I knew it was meant to be a loose cowl-neck pull-over. And it would be mine. I guess if pressed, I would deny that the fabric literally spoke to me, but fellow sewists will recognize that subtle whisper.

I love cowl neck garments in the cooler months. Now that there are so many lovely lightweight knits on the market, sweaters can use bulkier design elements like cowls, gathers, and draping. With that in mind, I landed on Vogue 9055. One of the views was exactly what I had in mind. View C is a cowl-neck raglan tunic with a high-low hem and a kangaroo pocket (which I omitted). Although I had recently done a raglan tee and copied out a good version of the pattern, I chose to start fresh with this one since I was looking for a garment with more ease.

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The sleeve pieces fit together so the outside wraps around the inside. In other words, you have a seam on each side of your wrist, not one down the middle.

Vogue 9055 is a “Very Easy” pattern, and this time I agree. I spent more time preparing the pattern and cutting out the pieces than I did assembling everything. I even made it a bit more complicated by finishing all of the raw edges and it still was only about two hours of actual sewing.

This pattern was unusual in that it featured a two-part sleeve. I was a little concerned that the sleeve seams would be prominent and distracting in the finished garment, but my fears were unfounded. I’m intrigued and hope to learn more about them and how they can best be used.

I was surprised that the neckline was so deep. It’s clearly shown on the illustrations, but somehow I didn’t notice. I think if I were to make this with the regular scoop neckline, I would make the neckline a little higher. I would also try omitting the darts, especially if I was going for a sportier look.

Once again, I used serger thread only for the serger’s loopers and used “regular” thread for the serger needle. It would have been nice to match all of the thread, but when the garment is on, the black looper threads don’t show at all.

Next time, a short detour into activewear again. What are you making for fall?